Ebay Customers Welcome!

DSC01404Rabbit-Compost-ChichupacAug05

Wow!  This little hobby of mine has taken off in a short amount of time. My site now has over 1,000 hits in just a few months. A big thanks to all my customers who have made all this possible!

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34 thoughts on “Ebay Customers Welcome!

  1. I have a question vs. a comment so I’ll post it here. I want to use earthworms to airate the beds of my greenhouse. Can I just dig them into the ground along with some food for them. Can they survive from what’s in the soil. T tried using your wordpress but there were no postings. Thanks.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Hi Pippy,

    Thanks for following my site. Awesome to have a gardener on board. Great question too! I wish there was a solid black/white answer for you. Much of this depends on your gardening methods. It will not work very well w/ traditional tilling methods. However, if your prepare your beds w/ a 2-3” layer of compost or vermicompost and then top this off w/ a 6” layer of straw, composted bark mulch etc., I think the worms will do fairly well. In the fall, peel back the mulch layer, add more compost and repeat this again in the spring a few weeks before planting. Even if the worms don’t survive the winter their cocoons will. That is unless you live in the Yukon! If I was specifically looking for a worm to aerate my beds then Red Wigglers would not be my first choice. This is because they like to be in the top 2-4” of the surface. European Night Crawlers prefer to be a little deeper and I think they would be better suited to aerating the soil for you. I hope to have some ENC available by spring.

    Thanks
    Tony

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  3. It’s great to see that one (or maybe more!) of you are really taking advantage of ‘The library of Resources’ page. That’s exactly what it is for. Hope it is helping some of you!

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  4. I was considering ordering a 1000 red worms for a new inside bin, I already have a large compost area outside, so I have questions. I live in New York do you pack the worms in ice packs also? What will keep them alive? How long will it take to get them to me? Thanks Debbie

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Hi Debbie,

    Thanks for taking a look! Great questions too. I’ve had good success on mailing worms all over the country. So far I’ve had 100% success shipping to Puerto Rico! I’ve had a couple of failures recently too, just to be honest. One package was a fluke as it appears it may have spent 8 hours in a mail truck. The other package that did not make it successfully was completely my fault. I shipped this package with worm culture that was too wet. In both of these cases I will simply resend some worms free of charge.

    So to answer your question… no, I don’t use ice packs. I haven’t found any that would be cost-effective or would last long enough to make it worthwhile. The worms seem to ship very well in the worm culture I raise my worms in. That is as long as I do my part. Most of the time I ship orders on Monday and my customers receive their worms on Wednesday or Thursday. It is imperative that the customer be home and take immediate care of the worms when they arrive. Even if a customer lets the worms cook in their mailbox I will still replace the worms if the customer is willing to pay for shipping. I just want people to have fun and enjoy their new pet/hobby.

    Thanks again,
    Tony

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  6. Thinking of ordering the 500 worm starter kit to use for fishing. I am using a mixture of soil and shredded newspapers and feeding with mostly lettuce.I am using a old extra large cooler.I live in NC. Will this type of set up work and will they survive the winter?

    Liked by 1 person

    • This kind of set-up can work to raise a few worms. Do you have any holes drilled into the cooler? It’s possible to keep this running through winter but it won’t be easy. Even for me it would require constant monitoring. Certainly wouldn’t survive a Montana winter. Can you keep them in a garage? There are soil heating cables available if you have power nearby. Get a small one w/ a thermostat.

      From your description of what the worms are being fed very few if any worms will grow to fishing size. I discussed in detail in the ‘lets talk wiggler’ section on how to get them to grow larger. I’m hoping to be selling some organic worm food that I make myself to make it easier for my customers to grow them to fishing size.

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  7. Hi,
    I would like to know if you have tried all vermicomposting methods? I started with the Rubbermaid system, then moved to untreated wood, but both gave me a headache harvesting the castings. As a result and after careful research, I am trying the Worm Inn method.
    Do you have any experience with the Worm Inn and if so, how was it? I read it is better than all other methods, but opinions are like A holes, we all have them, but what are your 2 cents on this Worm Inn?

    PS: Is there any breeding or feeding differences between Eisenia fetida and Eisenia hortensis? I know the hortensis are larger.
    Thanks,
    JT

    Liked by 1 person

  8. JT,

    I have used Rubbermaid containers, Horizontal flow through, Vertical flow through, and I also use windrows. The vertical flow through is without a doubt the most effective method of producing castings.

    I have not and will not ever use a Worm Inn. They simply cost too much for what they are. They are one small step above a Rubbermaid container. If you want real information without opinion read Clive Edwards “Vermiculture Technologies” posted in the Library of Resources section. I have also posted pictures of both horizontal and vertical flow throughs w/ a short description of how each system works. If you can feed your worms composted material instead of raw food scraps you will greatly increase how quickly you can make vermicompost.

    Hortensis will breed slower than Foetida. They also prefer to be deeper in the bedding than does Foetida. Do not use this worm in a Vertical flow through. I say this because of how the system is harvested from below without disturbing Red Wigglers and no need for screening out worms. Adding Hortensis will defeat this purpose because of their tendency to dig down in the beds.

    For everyone out there Hortensis is the European Nightcrawler. Foetida is the Red Wiggler.

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    • I greatly appreciate your 2 cents and the link to the Clive Edwards’ book. You have opened my eyes and ears.
      However, how can I take my raw food scraps and compost them to then feed my worms? If the answer is in the Edwards’ link, just reply, see link.
      Thanks again for your knowledge and esp. the UNBIASED information.
      PS: Since I already ordered some Hortensis worms for my vermicomposting and you say they will not work well in the Vertical Flow through system, how can I use these worms, since I can’t return them? Should I just put them in my raised bed garden or make a windrow or any other options?
      Thanks for all,
      JT

      Liked by 1 person

      • Hi JT,

        There is a link for how to compost properly in the vermicompost section and I think the library as well from Cornell University that is a quick and easy read to get you started composting. May I ask what you’re goal is for raising the worms? How much vermicompost are you looking to produce each year?

        As far as the Euro’s go I would raise them in a horizontal flow through. I have a picture of one I built around here. I’m actually halfway through building one right now and I should post a picture or two of it.
        I also need to dig up some numbers on what the expected worm population and vermicompost production in each system is capable of. I can tell you from my experience the vertical flow through is the best. Horizontal is next…then I would say windrow but it’s hard to say. Windrows are just so much bigger. Then far, far, down on the list is the Worm Inn and Rubbermaids. The Worm Inn I would just hate to spend the money on. But for the sake of convenience and a small kitchen scrap recycling goal in mind I guess it’s OK. If it were me I’d rather spend the hundred bucks on lumber and screws and build something better.

        OK, I’m rambling now. Thanks for the great questions. Hope this helps.

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      • JT,

        I made a BIG mistake!!! The Worm Inn is a very high quality product. I am sorry but I confused it with a product called The Worm Factory 360, which is absolute garbage. I am very sorry about my confusion over the two. If I don’t hear from you I will shoot you an email to let you know. I would have no qualms about selling this product in the future as my business expands.

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  9. Just want to say how impressed I am with all of you! I can see what the ‘top clicks’ are and it looks like you folks are taking advantage of the Library. Very awesome to see!

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    • Hi Antoinette,

      When I separate worms using a screen it is actually quite rare anymore. I chose not to go this route because it is so labor intensive. I know how many worms are in a good handful so it’s fairly easy to fill a 200, 500 or 1,000 worm order. I try to make sure there are far more worms than what the customer ordered and provide the added value of the worm culture.

      Oh, but to answer your question! Screen all your worms out of your material using a 1/4” screen. All the material that fell through the screen will now have cocoons in it. I’m assuming you want to know how to get the cocoons out of your vermicompost? You have to pick them out one by one. Just kidding. Can you imagine how long that would take! It’s really very simple, simply wait 2-4 weeks and most of your cocoons will hatch into worms. You have some time before these newly hatched worms become capable of hatching their own cocoons. So you just screen the material a second time to remove these newly hatched worms. The screening process is much easier this time and you may even want to use an 1/8” screen.

      Hope I was able to help you. I look forward to getting some African NightCrawlers myself.
      Thanks for checking out the site!

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      • Thanks so much. What size screen should I use first? Next question I first used potting soil to start and started inside. I had a ton of worms so I moved them outside they stopped reproducing. I moved them back inside and now the soil stays dry. I don’t even have tea! I used to have a jar (spaghetti size) weekly. I am ordering the gallon from you to boost up production. I purchase fresh veggies from the store since I don’t make enough scraps myself.
        Oh thank you for the tip about waiting 4 weeks then screening again.

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  10. Hi Antoinette,

    I am quite surprised that the African Night Crawlers survived or did not try to escape when you put them outside! You must live in a warm place. I am certain your Red wigglers are still reproducing outdoors. A soil based medium for your worms will favor African Nightcrawlers….the wigglers won’t like it as much. You can use just a 1/4” screen for the entire process. Or on your second pass to remove newly hatched cocoons you can use 1/8” screen…it’s up to you.

    Can you tell me what type of bin you are using??

    If you are getting ‘tea’ or liquid coming out of the bottom of your bin…it means you are overwatering or keeping your bedding too wet. In the last 10 years or more of raising worms I haven’t had a drop of runoff or liquid come out of my bins. The ‘tea’ that comes out of systems like this are likely anaerobic and honestly are pretty much worthless for gardening. If you feel your bin is drying out on top mist it lightly and occasionally with a spray bottle. If you would like to learn how to make a proper compost tea then I would urge you to check out this site http://microbeorganics.com/

    Now lets get to what you are feeding your worms. I cannot promote feeding your worms fresh vegetable from the store. I’m sorry but this is wasteful in more than one way. Most vegetables are 90% water and this is what you are paying for. Please take a look at how to compost http://cwmi.css.cornell.edu/compostbrochure.pdf If you need help after looking at this please let me know what types of material are available to you. Used coffee grounds and leaves are two materials that nearly everyone has access to and they are also FREE!!! Most coffee shops are more than happy to give you their used coffee grounds.

    Hope this helps.

    Like

    • I have a flow through system. I drilled holes in the top two storage drawers of the 3 drawer storage bins. I use whatever I have veggie wise left from fresh salads that I may make. I drink instant coffee on occasions. I have leaves in the fall but they dont seem to like them as much as the fruits and veggies. I put them out in the summer and none tried to leave. I am using them (worms)for multiple purposes…..1. To feed my axolotls…2. Side business small scale…3. Reduce my foot print.

      I stir my drawers daily to search for worms for my fish.

      Watermelon and cabbage seem to be their favorite

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  11. Antoinette,

    If you plan to do this as a small hobby business like myself you are going to have to do some reading in order to make it successful. In my opinion Clive Edwards “Vermiculture Technologies” is an absolute must for you to read. There isn’t much room for overhead in this business. Meaning that 99% of my inputs are absolutely free.

    The more you dig around in your bins for worms the less they will reproduce. I would minimize this as much as possible or start a new bin specifically for your fish. Hope this helps.

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  12. Hi I’m new in the worming business and I want really bad to make my own black gold:-) my question are I always have lots of bananas,tomatoes and coffee grounds at hand so how can I use them correctly? Also last but not least manure(what an awful thing to say) chooks and rabbit manure to be exactly. Haven’t done this before and don’t want to hurt the wigglers…thanks

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    • Hi Ricky,

      You can take your fruits/vegetable waste, manure, and coffee grounds and mix it with straw, sawdust, and or leaves. The bigger the pile the better! Mix it up every now and then. You should notice it getting very hot and perhaps ‘steaming’. Once it cools down and smells earthy and forest-like you will be able to feed it to your worms.

      The rabbit hutch could be setup right over the top of a worm bin and supplement the need to feed the worms. I’ll post a pic of this at the top of this page if I can find one. I would love to be able to try something like this but unfortunately I can’t right now. Also, check out the ‘Library’ for some good reading or any of the posts. Don’t be afraid to ask more questions either.

      Thanks
      Tony

      Like

    • Hey thanks Jim! You were the one who reminded me I even built the site to begin with! I’m actually going to be upgrading the site very soon. This is going to allow everyone to post pictures and just make it easier in general. Jim remind me in a few months or so and I will send you some European Nightcrawlers for free as a thank-you from me.

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    • Hi Amanda, There will be many adult worms in your order. You can identify the adults by a ‘band’ being present on the worm known as a clitellum. Take a look at the ‘getting started’ page and the ‘library’ for help w/ creating the proper environment for your worms.

      Thanks again. Let me know how your ordered turned out. I had a confusing shipping week and just barely was able to get the worms to the Post Office on time. This goes for everyone else too! If for some reason I messed up your order please let me know and I will make things right for you. Really I just want everyone to have fun w/ their new worm project and not have to worry about obtaining the worms. Trying to make the process stress-free for everyone!

      Thanks,
      Tony

      Like

  13. Hey guys and gals,

    I’m having a hard time figuring out who is actually following my site AND ordered some worms! Antoinette, Amanda, and Wilson are getting extra worms. Am I missing anyone?

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  14. Just ordered the 200 starter set… Hope to get an extra free!!! Will be placing one in straight manure and the other in peat moss… We will see how this goes! My 3 year old want his own bin!!

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  15. Hi Nicky,

    Looks like that offer was about a month ago. However, I’ll try to toss in some extra worms w/ your order just because you are so excited! Be sure to take a look at the “Getting started” page and the “library of resources”.and feel free to ask any questions.

    Like

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